Women of Excellence Unplugged- What advice did you take away from these women?

At the event on Tuesday, Benita Zahn, the phenomenal moderator, asked the women several insightful questions that provided great advice to the audience made up of both women and men.

One of the two-part questions she asked the women was, “Do you ever think about reinventing yourself and how do you stay relevant?”

It was a question that I asked the lovely woman that I  sat next to, Dorcey Applyrs.  I believe you will see Dorcey on the dais in the future.  To me, she is a woman of excellence.  Briefly, she is currently the 2017 Ambassador for Girls, Inc.  She is the councilwoman for Albany’s First Ward and is the Faculty Program Director for the Public Health School of Health Sciences for Excelsior College.  Her answer below is likely the reason she is so accomplished.

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Do you think about reinventing yourself?

“Yes, ALL of the time! I am innately introspective. I constantly think about ways to satisfy those inner thoughts and feelings that challenge me to live my best life and simply be happy. This requires me to think about who and where I am in the context of the present and future. My life experiences have taught me that evolution is a necessary part of living life to its fullest.  Failing to be intentional about change and reinventing myself can only result in stunted growth, complacency and not being fulfilled.”

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For me, honoree, Dr. Suzie Mookherjee’s “live your truth” and Dorcey’s advice about failing to be intentional about change can only result in stunted growth are two of the many pieces of inspirational advice I took away from the event.

What struck you as being an eye-opener or made you nod your head in agreement?

 

 

 

 

7 Laws That Helped Women Make History in the Workforce

WBC event
Women’s Business Council- We are a force. 

As Women’s History month came to a close in March, I found this article on LinkedIn.  What caught my attention were the dates.  Take a quick look at the long history and recent history of the laws that have helped women in their fight for equality in the workplace.

  • Fair Labor Standard Act of 1938
  • The Equal Pay Act if 1963
  • Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII)
  • The Pregnancy Discrimination Action of 1978
  • The Family Medical Leave Act of 1993
  • Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994
  • The Affordable Care Act of 2010

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/7-laws-helped-women-make-history-workforce-tom-spiggle

om Spiggle, Principal at The Spiggle Law Firm
Published on March 31, 2017

Tracking the trends in ‘blue’ vs. ‘pink’-collar jobs

As the Women’s Business Council celebrates 30 years of empowering women in business at every level, we’ve been taking a look back at how far we’ve come and thinking about what’s in store for the future.

When it comes to trends in jobs, it looks like things have changed quite a bit in the last 30 years. According to a recent article in the New York Times, lots of jobs predominantly done by men (like machine operator or welder, for example) have been disappearing, while occupations that employ mostly women are quickly growing.

If you take a look at the graphic in that NYT article, you’ll see a depiction of how the fastest-growing jobs, as predicted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, are predominantly done by women, with only a few exceptions. Jobs in the healthcare industry in particular, from home health aides to nurse practitioners, are more than 80% female and are projected to grow significantly in the years ahead.

What seems crazy to me as a casual observer is that when men who enter these fields, which the story refers to as “pink-collar” occupations, they are paid more and promoted faster than women. Sociologically speaking, this trend is referred to as the “glass escalator.”

Perhaps that’s why this chart reflecting data from the Census Bureau for Albany, NY shows higher average salaries for men in common jobs including those most likely dominated by women:

data-usa-bar-chart-of-wage-by-gender-for-common-jobs-in-albany-ny

On the bright side, I suppose, the NYT article notes that women enter into male-dominated fields more than men enter female-dominated fields. And those male-dominated fields tend to be well-paid. Yet on the flip side, other studies point to drops in pay, negative perceptions, and more health problems as women take over male-dominated roles.

So where does that leave us? I’d say we still have room to grow when it comes to promoting women in the workplace. But don’t take my word for it…

Join us for our next WBC program, The Evolution of Women in Business, on February 14 at The Desmond Hotel & Conference Center. Hear from a panel of past Women of Excellence Award recipients on how they predict women in the workplace will be propelled toward advancement in the future.